Tagged: tourism

PYO fruit and vegetable farms

I’ve been planning to visit some PYO fruit & vegetable farms for a while so we finally made the time to go for an exciting day in the Farm Gate Trail of the Hawkesbury region.

PYO (pick your own) fruits and veggies is a great idea to get in touch with nature, pluck your produce straight from the trees and spend some relaxing time talking to some passionate and laid-back farmers in the countryside of NSW.
It is also a fun an educational experience for children, who can see where their food comes from.

So off we went to Hawkesbury, approximately one and a half hours north-west of Sydney. We checked the harvest calendar and knew what was in season and which farms to go to.

I was particularly interested in finding feijoa – a fruit that is originally from the South of Brazil and It is usually very hard to find in Australia.

It was a typical Autumn day: very sunny but cold and the colour of the vegetation had a stunning mixture of green, orange, brown, yellow and red. There was this amazing smell of cinnamon and apple in the air. So it is definitely not too hard to find a good apple pie in the region!

I really enjoyed our PYO stop at Bilpin Springs Orchard:we were guided by a young bloke that gave us a basket and pointed us to the middle of the orchard, where a farmer met us and assisted everyone very patiently on picking the best fruits without damaging the trees.

We were the only two interested on feijoas so we had a guided feijoa tasting with the farmer while filling up our basket.

We were charged $3.50 per kilo of any fruits. Apples, persimmons and feijoa are all in season so we got a bit carried away by the experience and ended up bringing home more food than what we actually needed.

Among numerous rustic roadside sheds selling fresh produces, we had homemade apple pies from The Local Harvest, from where we also stocked up some free-rage eggs and potatoes.

We finished our day trip at Mount Tomah Botanic Garden in the Blue Mountains where we had a late lunch in the terrace, overlooking the cool climate gardens and the endless vista of the foggy and blueish Mountains.

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Provence and a bit of Monaco

It is really hard to describe how magic, stunning and peaceful the region of Provence is.

Once you are there, you can really feel the vibe that inspires so many writers: fresh food and produces, the colour of the Côte d’Azur contrasting with the mountains, the happiness of the locals, the traditional dishes from each village, the Rose wines, the aroma, the architecture, the craft, the sunset…

Since this was the last and the best leg of my trip to Europe this year, I’ve decided to do a photo log of some of our best moments in South of France.
The last two shots are from another dream that came through as part of this amazing trip: the Monaco Grand Prix.


Saint-Rémy-de-Provence


Les Baux-de-Provence


Les Baux-de-Provence


Les Baux-de-Provence


Les Baux-de-Provence


Les Baux-de-Provence


Gordes


Calanque de Sormiou between Marseille and Cassis


Calanque de Sormiou


Calanque de Sormiou


La Ciotat


Pampelonne


Pampelonne


Saint-Tropez


Port Grimaud


Saint-Raphael


Nice


Nice


Nice


Nice


Villefranche-sur-Mer


Villefranche-sur-Mer


Principauté de Monaco


Principauté de Monaco

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Pont du Gard – South of France

Unless you are pretty lucky, It is not really everyday that you wake up in the middle of South of France.

I was lucky enough to spend the end of my holidays traveling through Provence and exploring all those little scenic villages that I used to dream about when watching Le Tour de France on TV.

From Carcassonne we drove to Pont du Gard, an ancient Roman aqueduct bridge that crosses the Gard River in southern France. This is where we slowed down and started enjoying some priceless time in touch with nature: the smell of fig blossoms everywhere, the most ancient and largest olive trees that I’ve ever seen and a remarkable day swimming in a river with the picturesque aqueduct as the background.

The only thing that made us leave that 30°C day and move to our next destination was basically the fact that we had no food in our pack and we were getting hungry. Yes, I was very hungry but instead of the usual bad mood that I will be on in situations like that, I was feeling extremely energised.

And just when I couldn’t hope for more, we passed by these huge cherry fields that looked like a painting.

I’m sure I could do a bit of foraging here If I wish but this is one of those places that deserves respect. We stopped by a small stand at the end of the field and we found this lovely French lady selling the cherries per 3€ a kilo. Are you serious ?????? Je voudrais un kilo de cerises s’il vous plaît?

So exciting!

This was truly one of those unforgettable days that is worth to write about….and I can’t wait to see what comes next!

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