Category: Desserts

Bolo de Rolo

Guava roll cake (Bolo de Rolo) is a typical Brazilian delicacy from Pernambuco, a beautiful State in the Northeast Coast of Brazil.
It is an artisan cake made of very thin layers of a buttery batter rolled into thin layers of guava paste.

Tourists never leave Pernambuco without taking some Bolo de Rolo home as a souvenir and it is part of the fun the search for the place that sells the most authentic cake, the thinnest layered cake, the one with the highest number of layers, local’s favourite and so on.

The cake is served in fine slices, which balances well the sweetness of a single portion.

It has been in my “must do” list for a while and after a crazy week at work, It was about time to enjoy myself in a sort of craft work in the kitchen. The idea was already making me salivate so I decided to give it a go.

Mariano had some things lined up for the day but he couldn’t resist the sweetness perfume around the house so he decided to stick around and watch me in my first attempt of making Bolo de Rolo.

I got so excited in this food therapy that the outcome was nothing less than a delicious 6 layers cake, crafted very gently in fun and relaxing afternoon.

Bolo de Rolo

Ingredients

250 g sugar
250 g butter
250 g all purpose flour
5 eggs, separated
water
200 g guava paste
white sugar for sprinkling

Filling

Slice the guava paste in small cubes and microwave it for about a minute or until it melts. Let it cool down.

Batter

Preheat oven to 180°C.
Grease a shallow squared baking tray with the butter and flour.

In a large bowl, whisk the sugar and butter until incorporated.
Gradually add the eggs yolks into the mixture.
Add the flour and keep folding it until you have a light batter.
Beat egg whites in a mixer or a whisk until soft peaks form.
Fold the egg whites into the batter gently.

Method

Spread a thin layer of the batter into the baking tray.
Bake for approximately 4 or 5 minutes. Use your fingers to touch the cake and ensure that it is dry and soft so you can roll it easily.
Place the baked cake in a wet kitchen towel.
Spread a thin layer of guava paste and roll it up quickly, with the help of the towel.
Bake another layer of the batter, spread the guava paste and start rolling it where the previous layer ended.
Repeat the same process until the last layer.
Sprinkle white sugar on top of the cake.

Slice it thinly and gently.

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Sagu – Tapioca Pearls in Red Wine

Sagu - Tapioca Pearls in Red Wine

Having grown up in Brazil, eating Sagu when I was young was definitely one of the few ways to taste some wine and feel a bit dipsy just by having a dessert.

Sagu is a dessert made of tapioca pearls which is a bit different from sago: the tapioca starch is extracted from cassava root while the sago starch is extracted from the pith of sago palm stems.

Tapioca Pearls

Commercially both types of starch are processed into several forms and the pearls are very popular among the Asians, served usually in teas or smoothies.

Tapioca Pearls

The Brazilian dessert is very unique: the pearls absorb the wine and become very chewy. It is served chilled but the combination of the wine and the cloves kind of warm you up. Once you give it a try, you can pretty much say that you have eaten some wine, if it makes any sense.

Sagu

SAGU by Mais Voce

Ingredients

1 cup tapioca pearls
3 cups red wine
1 cup sugar
10 cloves

Method

In a large saucepan, boil 3 liters of water.
Add the tapioca pearls and stir gently until it boils again.

Remove from heat and cool inside the lidded pot, stirring it occasionally for about 2 to 3 hours.

Using a colander, drain all water and wash the pearls quickly to remove the sticky gum.

Transfer the pearls back to saucepan, add sugar, wine and cloves. Bring it back to heat until it boils.

When boiling, remove from heat and place in a glass bowl. Leave it in the fridge and serve the next day.

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Brigadeiro and Beijinho

Brigadeiro, Beijinho e Bicho de Pé

If you’ve read some of my previous posts, by now you should have probably noticed how nostalgic I can be. I love listening to eighties songs, watching old TV commercials, talking about toys and childhood games, all back to the time when I was little. I can sometimes spend hours challenging friends on who can remember more cartoons characters, series names and jingles.

The last few weeks have been very nostalgic since Isabella, my friend’s daughter, was turning one and mum Estela decided to throw her a party. Estela decided to literally take matters into her own hands and make the decorations and food herself. She produced some wonderfully delicate finger food and interactive decorations. The party was absolutely amazing. Light hues of yellow, blue and pink celebrated the baby theme. But a Brazilian party is never complete without there being enough food for one to complete gorge themselves. Think esfihas, chicken and palmito empadinhas, hot dogs, picanha, pães de mel, brigadeiro, beijinho and bicho de pé – all there to complete the Brazilian style feast.

With forty people to feed, Estela was going to need help, so I volunteered to assist her in preparing for the day. Estelas husband Roger and I couldn’t stop talking about our birthday parties when we were little, and how the entire family used to help with cooking and decorations. We laughed so much about some crazy things that we don’t see anymore, like for example sticking skewers of salami, antipasti and pickles into a whole cabbage, and thinking it was the height of fashion. Perhaps, like the rest of my friends, I’m in denial about my mother ever making this cabbage pincushion, but Ive seen it so many times, and someones mom must have made it, though none of us are willing to admit it.

I guess there is one thing that hasn’t changed since that time: the great feeling of accomplishment after throwing a party like this. It is not only about seeing your guests enjoying themselves, it is also about the excitement of being part of what happens behind the scenes.

Though I might never share the recipe for the voodoo cabbage, I would like to share the recipe of two typical Brazilian sweets which are served at every Brazilian birthday party and I proudly made them for the occasion. These sweets are as essential to a Brazilian kids party as Fairy Bread is to an Aussie party!

Brigadeiro

Brigadeiro

Ingredients

1 can (Nestle) sweetened condensed milk
1 1/2 tbsp unsalted butter
2 tbsp cocoa powder
chocolate sprinkles
approx 30 small patty cases

Method

Mix the butter, condensed milk, cocoa powder in a pot.

Cook the mixture over medium heat for about 10 minutes, stirring it constantly until it loosens from the bottom of the pan or until it is thick.

Put the mixture on a greased plate and allow it to cool down.

Grease your hands with butter and take small amounts of candy and form into 3 centimeter balls.

Roll the balls in the chocolate sprinkles

Place balls in the patty cases.

Beijinho de Coco

Beijinho de Coco

Ingredients

1 can (Nestle) sweetened condensed milk
1 tbsp unsalted butter
100 g dried coconut flakes
50 g dried coconut for decoration
cloves for decoration
approx 30 small patty cases

Method

Mix the butter, condensed milk and 100 g coconut in a pot.

Cook the mixture over medium heat for about 10 minutes, stirring it constantly until it loosens from the bottom of the pan or until it is thick.

Put the mixture on a greased plate and allow it to cool down.

Grease your hands with butter and take small amounts of candy and form into 3 centimeter balls.

Roll the balls in the dried coconut

Place balls in the patty cases and place one clove in the center of each bonbon (for this occasion I’ve replaced the cloves with icing sugar flowers).

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